NHS

     Adviser: Mrs. Christine Wood  
Email: christine.wood@annaisd.org
     Remind: https://www.remind.com/join: text @f03d4126 to 81010
                         Remind works as NHS calendar as well

Community service hours for the summer and this school year. Remember, if I haven't pre-approved your ideas, you must have approval from me for hours to count. 


Election Process: Please read the roles and responsibilities for each office below.  If you want to run for an office, the following must be completed: 1. Write a formal letter of intent to run for office to Mrs. Wood no later than May 8th. This letter should clearly define which office you are running for, why you want to run for it, and what your plans are for the office in the upcoming school year. 2. By May 10th, have campaign poster with attached speech outlining why you would make a good officer for next year approved by Mrs. Wood and posted to wall for NHS members to view and read. 

Voting will occur throughout the day on May 12th.

Roles and Responsibilities of NHS Officers

Guideposts for Leadership

A leader:

  • Exercises power with people, not over them
  • Isn't satisfied with "this is the way we have always done it"
  • Learns from every experience—defeat or success
  • Earns—doesn't expect or demand—cooperation and respect from others
  • Develops the leadership potential in others
  • Has ideas and is willing to share them
  • Has no ulterior or hidden motives; is honest with the group
  • Always has time to listen to and consult with others
  • Is understanding and willing to commit
  • Doesn't waste other people’s time by being late.

    President

    The chapter president must maintain a delicate balance between leading and encouraging other officers, members, and interested students to take on leadership responsibilities.

    The role of the chapter president requires energy, time management skills, and a good relationship with the chapter, faculty, and student body. The president’s responsibilities extend beyond the students within the chapter. To be successful as an Honor Society president, you need to know how to handle many types of situations. You must be mature, organized, have sound judgment, and have the ability to work with many different kinds of people and personalities.

    As chapter president, you need to possess:

  • A positive attitude about yourself and your own worth, as well as the worth of others
  • The ability to listen
  • The ability to stimulate group spirit with an awareness of consequences
  • Self-discipline, self-knowledge, and self-determination
  • Patience, an open mind, and a willingness to reach consensus in decisions
  • The ability to delegate responsibility, share authority, and follow up without intimidation
  • Organizational skills or a great planning and scheduling program
  • Enthusiasm and dedication.

     

    As chapter president, it is likely you will be asked to:

  • Plan and conduct meetings with other officers
  • Develop chapter goals and plan how to achieve them each year
  • Coordinate the work of the chapter through the other officers and committees
  • Give assistance, guidance, and praise when appropriate
  • Act as a facilitator of group discussion
  • Maintain frequent communications with faculty and administrators
  • Work closely with the chapter adviser on project planning
  • Communicate with the principal regarding chapter activities
  • Be a spokesperson for the chapter at school, community, and civic organization meetings and events
  • Impartially select responsible, energetic, self-starting, cooperative individuals to serve on essential committees to achieve chapter goals
  • Prepare evaluations of chapter activities, meetings, and goals

     

    Promoting Democratic Meetings

    One of the most important tasks of the president is to preside over meetings with a democratic group atmosphere. Chapter meetings should be a place where:

  • Ideas are reviewed by their merit rather than on the status of the proposer
  • Decisions are made by the whole group with each member participating
  • Both quantity and quality of work are expected
  • Spontaneous ideas are exchanged
  • The leader is objective, rather than subjective, in praise and criticism
  • The leader functions as a regular group member, sharing work with the group
  • Genuine interest in work produces high motivation
  • Creative thinking continues with or without the leader present
  • Effective leadership stimulates awareness of those outside the group and the needs of the student body at large.

     

     

     

    Vice President

    The vice president's primary (and very necessary) role is to serve as the official replacement for the president should the president fail to function or be unable to fulfill his or her responsibilities.

    The vice president, more than any other officer, has the opportunity to be creative in the position beyond the primary job description. The vice president is the president's closest student adviser and assistant. The vice president and president must work very closely together to create a productive Honor Society. The president can't be everywhere and do everything required of the chapter's leader. There must also be another—a vice president—to assist and lead.

    In many chapters, the president serves as the point-person, the person out in front of everyone. The vice president can then serve as the behind-the-scene person who plans, organizes, schedules, and oversees to make sure the chapter work is done.

    To be successful as an Honor Society vice president, you need to know how to handle many types of situations. You must be mature, organized, have sound judgment, and have the ability to work with many different kinds of people and personalities. There is also the practical side of being vice president that requires energy, careful management of time, and a good relationship with the president, chapter members, committees, and the student body.

    To be a great vice president, you need to possess:

  • A positive attitude about yourself and your own worth, as well as the worth of others
  • The ability to listen
  • The ability to stimulate group spirit with an awareness of consequences
  • Self-discipline, self-knowledge, and self-determination
  • Patience, an open mind, and a willingness to reach consensus in decisions
  • The ability to delegate responsibility, share authority, and follow up without intimidation
  • Organizational skills or a great planning and scheduling program
  • Enthusiasm and dedication.

     

    As chapter vice president, it is likely that you will be asked to:

  • Assume the president's duties whenever necessary
  • Work closely with the president and have frequent, scheduled meetings
  • Assist in planning chapter meetings and agendas
  • Meet regularly with the chairs of all committees
  • Coordinate the work of the committees and chair an important committee
  • Maintain a schedule of projects delegated to committees and a timeline of each committee's work
  • Serve as an ex-officio member of each committee, attending meetings as possible
  • Work behind the scenes to help iron out differences between people
  • Give assistance, guidance, and praise when appropriate
  • Act as a facilitator of group discussions
  • Maintain frequent contact with faculty and administrators
  • Work closely with the chapter adviser.
  • Represent the chapter at school, community, and civic organization meetings
  • Participate in Honor Society-sponsored activities.
  • Support the purposes of your chapter, meet deadlines, and achieve goals.
  • Assume other duties as assigned by the president, such as serving as parliamentarian or meeting manager to keep meetings operating smoothly.

     

    Promoting Democratic Meetings

    An important task of the vice-president, like the president, is to preside over meetings with a democratic group atmosphere. Chapter meetings should be a place where:

  • Ideas are reviewed by their merit rather than on the status of the proposer
  • Decisions are made by the whole group with each member participating
  • Both quantity and quality of work are expected
  • Spontaneous ideas are exchanged
  • The leader is objective rather than subjective in praise and criticism
  • The leader functions as a regular group member, sharing work with the group
  • Genuine interest in work produces high motivation
  • Creative thinking continues with or without the leader present
  • Effective leadership stimulates awareness of those outside the group and the needs of the student body at large.

     

    Secretary

    The secretary’s primary responsibility is to keep the official records of chapter business and serve as the official correspondent for the chapter. The historical memory of the Honor Society on your campus depends on the quality of the secretary’s performance. Yours is a job that requires accuracy, neatness, and completeness.

    As secretary, you will be expected to:

  • Be the keeper of the records, designer of the agenda
  • Be organized
  • Know nearly everything about every meeting
  • Be alert to the calendar and the progress of committees
  • Be knowledgeable about meeting procedures
  • Spend time planning and organizing the chapter’s work.

     

    As chapter secretary, you need to possess:

  • A positive attitude about yourself and your own worth, as well as the worth of others including those in positions of authority
  • Self-discipline, self-knowledge, and self-determination
  • Organizational skills and knowledge of a word processing computer program
  • The ability to listen carefully and take excellent notes.
  • A filing system for reports and records of meetings.
  • Enthusiasm and dedication.

     

    As chapter secretary, it is likely that you'll be asked to:

  • Make up a master calendar of chapter meetings and schedule committee reports for the entire year
  • Establish a timeline for publishing the agendas
  • Prepare the agenda for meetings with the president and vice president
  • Notify chapter members of upcoming meetings and distribute agendas to them
  • Bring reference materials to every meeting, including copies of the constitution and bylaws; minutes from previous meetings; lists of committees; and committee reports
  • Take roll of attendees at meetings, either written or verbal, and keep records of who attended
  • Take minutes of the proceedings of all chapter meetings
  • Prepare and distribute the written minutes, with the president’s assistance, in a timely manner
  • Make certain that the administration and faculty receive copies of the minutes
  • Maintain chapter files including minutes and agendas
  • Type all required letters of the president, vice president, and chapter adviser
  • Maintain contact names, addresses, phone numbers, and e-mails of people with which the chapter regularly works
  • Send thank-you notes, birthday cards, and other courtesy notes as needed to teachers, administrators, and support staff members on behalf of the chapter
  • Produce a chapter directory with member contact information
  • Alert members to important correspondence.
  • Be responsible for coordinating all chapter reporting
  • Work closely with the chapter adviser on all planning.
  • Participate in Honor Society-sponsored activities.

    Taking Minutes

    Keeping an official record of what occurs at chapter meetings is one of the primary responsibilities of the secretary. Don't be intimidated by this responsibility. The very process of recording minutes can give you a deeper understanding of the issues faced by your chapter along with the ability to focus on what's important.

    In keeping the minutes, the secretary should record what was done at the meeting in an objective and impartial manner. Opinions, favorable or otherwise, should not be recorded. As secretary, don't make the mistake of trying to record everything that is said. Concentrate on getting the gist of the discussion and taking enough notes to summarize it later. Think in terms of issues discussed, major points raised, and decisions taken.

     

    There are several organizational steps to make your job easier:

  • Make attendance lists to help when you work with large chapters or committees. Make a master list of everyone and just check off each person’s name as they arrive.
  • Prepare an outline based on the agenda ahead of time and leave plenty of white space for notes. By having the topics already written down, you can easily switch to a new topic when the discussion moves on.
  • Develop standard forms to fill in during the meeting that must be completed by the person making a motion and submitted to you. This helps ensure that the correct wording of motions is entered into the minutes.
  • After the meeting, type up the minutes as soon as possible, while everything is still fresh in your mind. You should include the following items in the minutes:
    • Name of the group or committee
    • Place, time, and date of the meeting
    • Names of members present
    • Names of members excused or absent
    • Items discussed in the order listed on the agenda.
  • Briefly describe main points discussed and state actions taken such as votes, resolutions, motions, etc. It’s a good idea to attach a separate sheet to the minutes that summarizes all action items for future reference. List each item on which action is needed and the responsible chapter member. Proofread the minutes before submitting them and be sure to have the minutes approved by the president, committee chair, or adviser before distributing them to the members.

     

    Treasurer

    The treasurer's primary responsibility is to keep accurate records of all financial transactions of the chapter and periodically report a summary of these transactions at meetings.

    The treasurer predicts how money will be used in the future and makes concrete suggestions for saving money and increasing efficiency. To do the job correctly, a treasurer must keep track of all expenditures and add the appropriate transactions to the account books. The treasurer should be the person concerned with regulating the flow of money, especially when many people want to spend it.

    As treasurer, you will be expected to:

  • Be the chief financial officer for your chapter
  • Know nearly everything about money, accounting, and budgeting
  • Be called upon to give financial advice
  • Be able to research and develop cost analysis
  • Keep accurate records of the chapter's finances.

     

    As chapter treasurer, you need to possess:

  • A positive attitude about yourself and your own worth, as well as the worth of others and of persons in positions of authority
  • Math and accounting skills
  • Self-discipline, self-knowledge, and self-determination
  • Patience and an open mind
  • Organizational skills or a great planning program
  • Enthusiasm and dedication.

     

    As chapter treasurer, it is likely you'll be asked to:

  • Work closely with the chapter president and adviser on all planning.
  • Work with the school financial officer or bookkeeper to learn and follow acceptable procedures.
  • Keep accurate, complete, up-to-date records of all chapter monies.
  • Authorize payment vouchers, review purchase orders, and give final approval before invoices are paid.
  • Review and evaluate budget requests for committee projects by their cost and potential benefit to the chapter/school and make recommendations for future activities.
  • Chair the finance/budget committee.
  • Assist in preparing the budget, present proposed budget to executive committee for approval, and help explain budgetary items to the membership.
  • Prepare a financial report for meetings of the chapter.
  • Assist the fundraising committee.
  • Work with the president and adviser to keep the principal informed of chapter activities and financial status.
  • Participate in Honor Society-sponsored activities.

     

    Managing the Money

    One of the most important tasks of the treasurer is to exercise sound accounting judgment. The treasurer is the most important technical position in an organization and he or she must be honest, accurate, and dependable.

     

    Historian

    The chapter historian’s primary responsibility is to collect and preserve information that provides a clear and concise record of all chapter activities for the year.

     

     

    As chapter historian, you need to possess:

  • A positive attitude about yourself and your own worth, as well as the worth of others including those in positions of authority
  • Self-discipline, self-knowledge, and self-determination
  • Organizational skills
  • A working knowledge of a good word processing program.
  • The ability to listen carefully and take excellent notes
  • A filing system for reports and records of meetings
  • A vision of the history of your school and community
  • Enthusiasm and dedication.

     

    As chapter historian, it is likely you'll be asked to:

  • Learn the history of your chapter, the school, and your community Seek resources for understanding the past activities of your chapter
  • Discuss with all committee and project chairpersons the type of information you need from them.
  • Maintain a master calendar of all chapter activities and verify contributions to the history files.
  • Create a list of contacts for useful historical resources, such as the local newspaper, morgue, city hall records, etc.
  • Create a method for incorporating images within your histories
  • Build a database of activities undertaken by the chapter
  • Make a formal record of all officers, committee chairs, advisers, awards earned, etc., for each year
  • Build up records of your chapter’s past, starting with old yearbooks
  • Establish a "famous persons" file for individuals from your chapter who have gone on to achieve great things, either locally, in the state, nation, or world
  • Learn new presentation skills
  • Build interest in your chapter's history among all members
  • Notify chapter members each month of important historical events from your chapter’s past
  • Encourage other organizations on campus to follow your lead and build their organizational histories

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



New officers for 2016-2017 school year as follows:

Skylar VanNorman--President
Karsyn Poyner--Vice-President
Secretary-- Devin O'Neal
Treasurer-- Sydney Jones
Ally Fudge--Historian







Current members: Please read the following below.

Community Service Hours must be approved by adviser if not done through NHS sanctioned activities.


 


3. This is the link to use to register your service hours during the 2016-2017 school year.

http://goo.gl/forms/jVx41g397Y

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